How to frame an heirloom quilt

Quilting traditions are particularly prominent in the United States, where the necessity of creating warm bedding met the paucity of local fabrics in the early days of the colonies. Imported fabric was very expensive, so it was essential for most families to use and preserve textiles efficiently. Small pieces of fabric were joined together to make larger pieces, in units called “blocks”. Creativity could be expressed in the block designs, or simple “utility quilts”, with minimal decorative value, could be produced.

Hand sewing to an acid free substrate

Shown is a quilt being sewn down to a neutral colored acid free matboard. These blocks were presented to grandchildren and brass plates were mounted at the bottom with the date and presenting information. A space was created between the quilt and the conservation glass. This space helps preserve the quilt and the glass will protect against UV light.


Framed Quilt Block

We have framed many smaller sections of quilts that were never finished, called blocks. They are not only very colorful but are a way of preserving a cherished item, often handmade by a family member.

Athens Art and Frame - Custom Framing

Framed Quilt Block

Athens Art and Frame - Custom Framing

Several quilt blocks sewn together

Athens Art and Frame - Custom Framing
Athens Art and Frame - Custom Framing

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Athens Art and Frame - Custom Framing